"1,225%"
"While toy libraries target younger children, libraries that offer video games draw teens. A librarian at the Houston Public Library tells NPR that offering game consoles and iPads “results in a 15% to 20% increase in the circulation of books.” The games themselves also seem to help struggling readers, with some reading text in video game format “that was up to eight grades above their reading level,” says Constance Steinkuehler, an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin.
Having gaming available at libraries has other advantages as well. It gives lower-income youth the chance to play games they may not be able to afford; offers teenagers a safe place; and helps teens understand that the library is a place where they can belong."
"The burden of debt has become the lens through which I see my workplace, and it is rapidly altering my view of my profession. I can no longer fulfill my classroom duties without wondering if the ultimate price, for many of my students, is a form of indenture. This is not an extreme way of putting it. After all, the indentured have to go into debt in order to find work, and their wages are then used to pay off the debts. I have concluded that it is immoral to expect young people to privately debt-finance a basic social good like education, especially if we are telling them that a college degree is their passport to a livelihood that is increasingly thin on the ground."

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler

She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”

While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.

She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).

“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:

"At what point do you take girls out of school altogether because boys can’t handle it?"
Parent of a female teen whose school banned leggings 

medievalpoc:

ladramaclub:

William Shakespeare’s Timon Athens performed by the Los Angeles Drama Club / Shakespeare in the City. These are mostly underprivileged kids from an underfunded and underserved who have been given an opportunity to break out of their hard situations.

Check out LADC at
www.losangelesdramaclub.com/

I was moved seeing these young children performing Shakespeare with such animation, enthusiasm, and skill.

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

the-goddamazon:

chazzfox:

cijithegeek:

kyssthis16:

yeezysdisciple:

youngbertreynolds:

thempress:



Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

who paying for these canvases or the art programs so these kids can have that? Why should it matter if these run down buildings that never get fixed up anyway get graffiti’d? 

Therein lies the issue. Art programs, both visual and performance based, are the first programs to be cut. Canvas ain’t cheap. Neither are the supplies. Much of the graffiti that takes place IS on buildings that are run down. The gov’t didn’t place any value on these properties and yet get pissy with dudes “vandalizing” their shit. You can’t have it both ways, ya dig. 

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.
One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.
First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.
There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

This whole post…I just find it really interesting! And sad, too, but good thing to read.

I remember suggesting to my mom to hire local graffiti artists (particularly POC artists) to advertise for her company by having them design murals and logos all over town.

the-goddamazon:

chazzfox:

cijithegeek:

kyssthis16:

yeezysdisciple:

youngbertreynolds:

thempress:

image

Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

who paying for these canvases or the art programs so these kids can have that? Why should it matter if these run down buildings that never get fixed up anyway get graffiti’d? 

Therein lies the issue. Art programs, both visual and performance based, are the first programs to be cut. Canvas ain’t cheap. Neither are the supplies. Much of the graffiti that takes place IS on buildings that are run down. The gov’t didn’t place any value on these properties and yet get pissy with dudes “vandalizing” their shit. You can’t have it both ways, ya dig. 

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.

One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.

First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.

There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

This whole post…I just find it really interesting! And sad, too, but good thing to read.

I remember suggesting to my mom to hire local graffiti artists (particularly POC artists) to advertise for her company by having them design murals and logos all over town.

redscrunchieofpower:

Today my grad school emailed out a huge listserve notification to all the English MA and PHD students about an exciting opportunity to spend the next 40+ years driving buses as “career drivers”. 

This is the job option for English majors from inside an English program. 

humansofnewyork:

"His grandmother and I are raising him. I worry about putting him into the public school system. I was a teacher for many years. I’ve seen so much confidence destroyed by the standardized system. Every human is born with natural curiosity. I’ve never seen a child who wasn’t inspired. But once you force someone to do anything, the inspired person is killed. I dropped out of school myself in 7th grade. So I know. I taught a GED course for years, so I’ve seen the end results over and over. I’ve seen so many kids who have complexes and insecurities because they were forced to do something they weren’t ready to do, and then they were blamed when they weren’t able to do it. What we call ‘education’ today is not organic. You can’t take something as complex as the human mind, compartmentalize it, and regiment its development so strictly."

humansofnewyork:

"His grandmother and I are raising him. I worry about putting him into the public school system. I was a teacher for many years. I’ve seen so much confidence destroyed by the standardized system. Every human is born with natural curiosity. I’ve never seen a child who wasn’t inspired. But once you force someone to do anything, the inspired person is killed. I dropped out of school myself in 7th grade. So I know. I taught a GED course for years, so I’ve seen the end results over and over. I’ve seen so many kids who have complexes and insecurities because they were forced to do something they weren’t ready to do, and then they were blamed when they weren’t able to do it. What we call ‘education’ today is not organic. You can’t take something as complex as the human mind, compartmentalize it, and regiment its development so strictly."

lauriehalseanderson:

"Malo-Juvera finds that the unit did yield significant results, particularly among young men whose initial scores indicated high levels of rape myth acceptance, and particularly with the She Wanted It component.”
Victor Malo-Juvera has published ground-breaking research (Research in the Teaching of English, Vol. 48, No. 4, May 2014) on how teaching SPEAK to 8th grade students changed their acceptance of rape mythology.
Books change (and save) lives. So do great teachers and librarians!

lauriehalseanderson:

"Malo-Juvera finds that the unit did yield significant results, particularly among young men whose initial scores indicated high levels of rape myth acceptance, and particularly with the She Wanted It component.”

Victor Malo-Juvera has published ground-breaking research (Research in the Teaching of English, Vol. 48, No. 4, May 2014) on how teaching SPEAK to 8th grade students changed their acceptance of rape mythology.

Books change (and save) lives. So do great teachers and librarians!