theyoungturks:

Lawyers for two Guantanamo Bay detainees cited the Hobby Lobby decision to argue for their clients’ rights to perform prayers during Ramadan. However, federal courts have argued that the detainees didn’t qualify as persons under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Wow.

Homelessness is now a crime in cities throughout the U.S.

newshour:

image

Eighteen percent of cities now ban sleeping in public, and 42% of cities ban sleeping in vehicles.

Learn more.

thechanelmuse:

High School picketerHouston, Texas, May 10, 1965 / Unidentified photographer.

thechanelmuse:

High School picketer
Houston, Texas, May 10, 1965 / Unidentified photographer.

rosalarian:

Gonna keep a tally of messages I get from a) white feminists completely proving my point and b) people who think this comic proves feminism is worthless because I criticized one part of it. (Even despite me writing these words underneath the comic.) Then I’ll add them all up, see which column has more, and then drink myself to sleep either way.
Haha… this is why we can’t have nice things.

rosalarian:

Gonna keep a tally of messages I get from a) white feminists completely proving my point and b) people who think this comic proves feminism is worthless because I criticized one part of it. (Even despite me writing these words underneath the comic.) Then I’ll add them all up, see which column has more, and then drink myself to sleep either way.

Haha… this is why we can’t have nice things.

silversarcasm:

wow yes people do get treated awfully when they get equated with disabled people

it’s almost like disabled people get treated awfully

"

If anyone had questioned how deeply the summer’s activities had penetrated the consciousness of white America, the answer was evident in the treatment accorded the March on Washington by all the media of communication. Normally Negro activities are the object of attention in the press only when they are likely to lead to some dramatic outbreak, or possess some bizarre quality. The march was the first organized Negro operation that was accorded respect and coverage commensurate with its importance. The millions who viewed it on television were seeing an event historic not only because of the subject but because it was being brought into their homes.

Millions or white Americans, for the first time, had a clear, long look at Negroes engaged in a serious occupation. For the first time millions listened to the informed and thoughtful words of Negro spokesmen, from all walks of life. The stereotype of the Negro suffered a heavy blow. This was evident in some of the comments, which reflected surprise at the dignity, the organization, and even the wearing apparel and friendly spirit of the participants. If the press had expected something akin to a minstrel show, or a brawl, or a comic display of odd clothes and bad manners, they were disappointed. A great deal has been said about a dialogue between Negro and white. Genuinely to achieve it requires that all the media of communications open their channels wide as they did on that radiant August day.

As television beamed the image of this extraordinary gathering across the border oceans, everyone who believed in man’s capacity to better himself had a moment of inspiration and confidence in the future of the human race. And every dedicated American could be proud that a dynamic experience of democracy in the nation’s capital had been made visible to the world.

"

Martin Luther King Jr reflects on the 1963 March on Washington in The Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr.

This struck me as a strong example of the amazing power of representation and being seen.

"in somali when we see injustice we say ‘dhiiga kuma dhaqaqo?’
which translates into ‘does your blood not move?’"
Warsan Shire, water   (via thepeacefulterrorist)
pbstv:

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was enacted 50 years ago today, outlawing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex and national origin.
See what events led up to this moment with a special Civil Rights Collection from PBS Black Culture Connection.

pbstv:

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was enacted 50 years ago today, outlawing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex and national origin.

See what events led up to this moment with a special Civil Rights Collection from PBS Black Culture Connection.

Bruce Davidson - Time of Change: Civil Rights Photographs, 1961-1965 (via)