theyoungturks:

Lawyers for two Guantanamo Bay detainees cited the Hobby Lobby decision to argue for their clients’ rights to perform prayers during Ramadan. However, federal courts have argued that the detainees didn’t qualify as persons under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Wow.

Homelessness is now a crime in cities throughout the U.S.

newshour:

image

Eighteen percent of cities now ban sleeping in public, and 42% of cities ban sleeping in vehicles.

Learn more.

thechanelmuse:

High School picketerHouston, Texas, May 10, 1965 / Unidentified photographer.

thechanelmuse:

High School picketer
Houston, Texas, May 10, 1965 / Unidentified photographer.

"The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything."
Scott Woods (X)
"

If anyone had questioned how deeply the summer’s activities had penetrated the consciousness of white America, the answer was evident in the treatment accorded the March on Washington by all the media of communication. Normally Negro activities are the object of attention in the press only when they are likely to lead to some dramatic outbreak, or possess some bizarre quality. The march was the first organized Negro operation that was accorded respect and coverage commensurate with its importance. The millions who viewed it on television were seeing an event historic not only because of the subject but because it was being brought into their homes.

Millions or white Americans, for the first time, had a clear, long look at Negroes engaged in a serious occupation. For the first time millions listened to the informed and thoughtful words of Negro spokesmen, from all walks of life. The stereotype of the Negro suffered a heavy blow. This was evident in some of the comments, which reflected surprise at the dignity, the organization, and even the wearing apparel and friendly spirit of the participants. If the press had expected something akin to a minstrel show, or a brawl, or a comic display of odd clothes and bad manners, they were disappointed. A great deal has been said about a dialogue between Negro and white. Genuinely to achieve it requires that all the media of communications open their channels wide as they did on that radiant August day.

As television beamed the image of this extraordinary gathering across the border oceans, everyone who believed in man’s capacity to better himself had a moment of inspiration and confidence in the future of the human race. And every dedicated American could be proud that a dynamic experience of democracy in the nation’s capital had been made visible to the world.

"

Martin Luther King Jr reflects on the 1963 March on Washington in The Autobiography of Martin Luther King Jr.

This struck me as a strong example of the amazing power of representation and being seen.

"in somali when we see injustice we say ‘dhiiga kuma dhaqaqo?’
which translates into ‘does your blood not move?’"
Warsan Shire, water   (via thepeacefulterrorist)
pbstv:

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was enacted 50 years ago today, outlawing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex and national origin.
See what events led up to this moment with a special Civil Rights Collection from PBS Black Culture Connection.

pbstv:

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was enacted 50 years ago today, outlawing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex and national origin.

See what events led up to this moment with a special Civil Rights Collection from PBS Black Culture Connection.

Bruce Davidson - Time of Change: Civil Rights Photographs, 1961-1965 (via)

girljanitor:

youarenotyou:

mattreadsthings:

fagglet:

historicaltimes:

"Disability activists abandon their wheelchairs and mobility devices and crawl up the 83 stone steps of the U.S. Capital Building demanding the passage of the American with Disability Act, March 12, 1990."

fucking badass.

I feel like there is a trend where photos of monumental moments in civil and human rights are presented in black and white, which really distracts from the reality that this happened less than 25 years ago.
This is a fucking badass demonstration and to present fighting ableism as something that happened a long long time ago is really just not reality.

^^^^^

Yeah, I think that it presents this in a sort of “we’ve come so far since then” kind of light, when that’s just not true. For example, in 2009 ADAPT protested the lack of long-term care services in the health care reform legislation with a very similar protest/sit-in:





You can go to their website to view “Action Reports” with photos on in-person protests and other events, including very recent ones.

girljanitor:

youarenotyou:

mattreadsthings:

fagglet:

historicaltimes:

"Disability activists abandon their wheelchairs and mobility devices and crawl up the 83 stone steps of the U.S. Capital Building demanding the passage of the American with Disability Act, March 12, 1990."

fucking badass.

I feel like there is a trend where photos of monumental moments in civil and human rights are presented in black and white, which really distracts from the reality that this happened less than 25 years ago.

This is a fucking badass demonstration and to present fighting ableism as something that happened a long long time ago is really just not reality.

^^^^^

Yeah, I think that it presents this in a sort of “we’ve come so far since then” kind of light, when that’s just not true. For example, in 2009 ADAPT protested the lack of long-term care services in the health care reform legislation with a very similar protest/sit-in:

image

image

image

image

image

You can go to their website to view “Action Reports” with photos on in-person protests and other events, including very recent ones.