fallen-inspiration:

My dear friend and acclaimed reporter, Ayman Mohyeldien, has been ordered by NBC News management to cease reporting in Gaza and leave the territory for his co-correspondent Richard Engel.

You’re asking why this matters?

Ayman Mohyeldien reported from Gaza what no other foreign media correspondent would show. He reported on the humanitarian crisis within Gaza; the unsanitary conditions, the countless dying and dead children, the failing infrastructure within Gaza, and the things that we didn’t see in Gaza until he was able to show us…to show America. To understand his impact, one should only observe his Instagram account (@AymanM). He’s the only MSM reporter who’s showing the true brutality that’s occurring in Gaza.

Is it because he’s telling the honest truth, or is it because he’s a person of color? After all, they did replace him with a blonde, white guy.

Bring back Ayman, and let’s see some unbiased reporting; because you can’t talk about jailed reporters in Egypt when you have your own reporters completely shutting their voices on the air.

#LetAymanReport

Israeli/Palestinian Conflict Resource Post

demarches:

Hey!  How’s it going tumbls.  I see we’ve got some Israel/Palestine feelings going around.  Good.  You should.  

But I know this conflict is crazed and heady, and so because it was asked and because I think it’s important, I’m going to write up a brief and totally not comprehensive list of books I think you can read to learn more about this conflict.  I’ve tried to include a variety of perspectives, and folks should feel free to tack on whatever things I’ve missed in any reblogs.  

The most important thing I want you to know about this conflict is it is complicated but learnable.  I promise.  And though it is difficult to know everything you need to know in order to understand how we got to this place in 2014 (I certainly don’t know all of it), it is less difficult to understand what possible solutions might look like and, frankly, solutions are what I am most interested in.  And I also believe we cannot find those solutions unless we understand what drives both sides of this conflict.  This is, perhaps, a controversial opinion in a conflict with asymmetric power dynamics, where one group is occupier and another is occupied.  But it’s what I believe.  It’s okay not to agree with that, some days even I don’t agree with that, but it is the primary thinking behind this post.

So here’s what I’m giving you: perspectives.  Most of which I like, some of which I don’t (but I’m not sharing which), and a hope that you will find something that speaks to you.  This has gone on long enough.  I want it to stop.  And I believe we can make it stop.

So.  Here we go.  A disclaimer I’m offering: I’m a two-state solution kind of gal, which isn’t everyone’s cup of tea and that’s fine.  I’m not writing this post to be didactic.  I’ve tried to put a few resources for one-staters in here, but I’m sure I’m missing some classics, so, please, if you know good books about a one-state solution, reblog and add them at the end so people can make up their own minds.  This whole list is eons from complete (it’s actually quite short, despite this intro), and honestly I spend most of my time studying up on the settlements so this leans heavily in that direction and I’m forgetting a lot of my bookshelf, but I’m relying on the rest of the internet to fill in my gaps.

Thanks for stopping by!

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"Why do wars begin? Any wars at all. You may be surprised to hear this from me yet nevertheless I am here to tell you that nothing good ever comes from any war. Ever. Of any kind. Only scarred and scared generations of young dying on front lines, puffing up only those old and powerful and arrogant and, most importantly, distant enough to imagine themselves as the hand of destiny, the God or Goddess of War, directing the fates of worlds when it’s really only the fates of the twenty-somethings and, heaven save us from our sins, teenagers who we send to die and die and die."
Patrick Ness, The Motivations of Sally Rae Wentworth, Amazon (featured in Topics About Which I Know Nothing)
"Feeling the thrill of it-
Cuz that’s it-
That’s the nasty, nasty secret of war-
When yer winning-
When yer winning, it’s ruddy-
thrilling-"
Monsters of Men, Patrick Ness, p.g. 62 
humanrightswatch:

Today the number of Syrian refugees in Lebanon will pass the 1 million mark. Three years after Syria’s conflict began, Lebanon has become the country with the highest per-capita concentration of refugees worldwide, struggling to keep pace with a crisis that shows no signs of slowing. Refugees from Syria now equal almost a quarter of the resident population.

humanrightswatch:

Today the number of Syrian refugees in Lebanon will pass the 1 million mark. 

Three years after Syria’s conflict began, Lebanon has become the country with the highest per-capita concentration of refugees worldwide, struggling to keep pace with a crisis that shows no signs of slowing. Refugees from Syria now equal almost a quarter of the resident population.

"You’re never more alive than in battle.”
“Never more dead after,” I say."
Patrick Ness - Monsters of Men

irresistible-revolution:

The Women Ridding Sri Lanka of Landmines

Jalini, 30, gets to work in the paddy fields in the ‘Vanni’, the ‘rice-bowl’ region of northern Sri Lanka. But she isn’t harvesting rice; rather she’s on the hunt for landmines, a deadly legacy of the violent 26 year-long conflict between the Sri Lankan government and the Tamil Tigers…until the various hidden landmines are identified and removed, the community in Thunnukai can’t work here. Jalini and her fellow de-miners have already found a dozen mines in this field alone, and believe there are some more. Across the north of Sri Lanka, an unknown number of land mines litter the once productive landscape, threatening lives and livelihoods.”

picturesfromgrandpa:

Sala (back row, far right).  Geppersdorf concentration camp, 1941.
When the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939, it was not immediately clear that they intended to kill the Jews of Europe.  In Sala’s home city of Sosnowiec, authorities ordered that one family member from each household be sent to work in a labor camp.  Sala volunteered to go in place of her sister, Rose.  She was sent to Geppersdorf labor camp where she worked in the laundry.  
After a year in the camps, some of the Jews working in Geppersdorf were allowed to return home for a “vacation.”  When she left home for the second time to return to the camp, her father blessed her as he said goodbye.  Sala never saw her parents again.  

picturesfromgrandpa:

Sala (back row, far right).  Geppersdorf concentration camp, 1941.

When the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939, it was not immediately clear that they intended to kill the Jews of Europe.  In Sala’s home city of Sosnowiec, authorities ordered that one family member from each household be sent to work in a labor camp.  Sala volunteered to go in place of her sister, Rose.  She was sent to Geppersdorf labor camp where she worked in the laundry.  

After a year in the camps, some of the Jews working in Geppersdorf were allowed to return home for a “vacation.”  When she left home for the second time to return to the camp, her father blessed her as he said goodbye.  Sala never saw her parents again.  

"The biggest myth about religion and violence, I believe, is that religion teaches hatred … I think the violence comes from a kind of love or desire for love for one’s own group and a willingness to do whatever it takes to obtain it."
Ariel Glucklich, Georgetown University